Intensive Course: The Philosophy of Information: Computer and Information Technology Ethics (Master Level) | TLU

December 2 – 6, 2013 | Tallinn University | ECTS: 5

Duration: 5 days

Students: 24 (max)

Teachers: Oliver Laas (Tallinn University) | Katrin Laas-Mikko (University of Tartu)

Registration: contact Regina-Nino Kurg via reginanino@yahoo.com.

Purpose of the course: The primary goal of the intensive course for Master Level students is to introduce them to philosophical issues surrounding information and communication technologies in light of current theoretical frameworks with a special emphasis on ethics.

Course description: Information and communication technologies have generated a complex of social, ethical, and cultural concerns. Current intensified technological development tends to outpace policymakers ability to regulate the newly emerging practices. This creates policy vacuums, many of which involve conceptual muddles, that is, confusions about the central notions involved in conceptualizing the vexing issues at hand. Hence an understanding of key concepts like technology, information, virtuality, informational privacy, intellectual property, and online identity is needed. Also relevant are overarching questions about the relationship between technology, society and culture. The course is designed to give an insight into current philosophical discussions of information and communication technologies from various perspectives, and to provide students with the basic vocabulary for tackling these topics in their own work.

Grading: The course is held in the form of lectures and seminars where students are expected to read articles and excerpts from selected texts. Students are graded on the basis of active participation in the lectures and seminars (20%), presentation (40%) and a written text (40%). The course consists of five days of classes organized around various topics in the philosophy of information and the ethics of information technologies technologies and including lectures, seminars and student presentations as specified in the timetable that appears below. Each student is expected to make a brief written summary and presentation of their chosen text along with questions and counterarguments for the active deliberation of all participants. The final written essay should deal with a relevant topic chosen by the student, and should not exceed 10 pages in length.

Timetable:

Monday, 2nd  of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “History of Information and Computer Ethics, and Some Basic Concepts —Information, Virtuality, Technology and Culture”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Drivers for Philosophical and Ethical Questions: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cloud Computing etc.”

Lunch

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “The philosophy of information: some basic issues”

Tuesday, 3rd of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Metaphysical Issues and Foundational Debates: Ontology, Methodology, and Intercultural Information Ethics”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Ethical Risks of Emerging Technologies: Moral Reasoning in Practical Context”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Metaphysical issues and foundational debates in information and computer ethics”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Wednesday, 4th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Identity, Community, and Trust in Democracy”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Between Chaos and Order: Cybersecurity” (security as paradigm, crime, cyberwar/terrorism, hackitivism)

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Online communities, identity, trust and security”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Thursday, 5th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Privacy and Information Technology: Various Perspectives”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Balancing Privacy Against Other Values: Cases of Surveillance Technologies”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Informational privacy, surveillance, and databases”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Friday, 6th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Intellectual Property, Distributive Justice and the Digital Divide”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Internet and Democracy: Balance of Control and Freedom.”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Intellectual property, the digital divide and other digital rights”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Seminar texts:

  • Seminar, 2nd of December: “The philosophy of information: some basic issues”

Floridi, Luciano. 2004. Information, in Luciano Floridi (ed.). 2004. The Blackwell Guide to Computing and Information. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., pp. 40-61.

Moor, James H. 1985. What is Computer Ethics?, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 263-275. (Online: http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~rogaway/classes/188/spring06/papers/moor.html)

Søraker, Johnny Hartz. 2011. Virtual Entities, Environments, Worlds and Reality: Suggested Definitions and Taxonomy, in Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 44-72.

Stahl, B. C. (2011) “What does the Future Hold? A Critical Review of Emerging Information and Communications Technologies and their Social Consequences” In Chiasson, Mike, Henfridsson, Ola, Karsten, Helena and DeGross, Janice I (2011). Researching the Future in Information Systems. IFIP WG 8.2 Working Conference, Future IS, Turku, Finland, June 6-8, 2011, Proceedings. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 59-76.

  • Seminar, 3rd of December “Metaphysical issues and foundational debates in information and computer ethics”

Brey, Philip A. 2012. Anticipating ethical issues in emerging IT. Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 305-317.

Capurro, Rafael. 2006. Towards an Ontological Foundation of Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 175-186.

Ess, Charles. 2006. Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 215-226.

Floridi, Luciano. 2008. Information Ethics: Its Nature and Scope, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 40-65.

Gert, Bernard. 2004. Common Morality and Computing. In Richard A. Spinello and Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2004. Readings in Cyberethics (2nd edition). Jones and Bartlett Publishers, pp. 96-106.

  • Seminar, 4th of December “Online communities, identity, trust and security”

Brunst, W. Phillip. 2010. Terrorism and the Internet: New Threats Posed by Cyberterrorism and Terrorist Use of the Internet, in. Marianne Wade and Almir Maljević. A War on Terror? The European Stance on a New Threat, Changing Laws and Human Rights Implications. New York: Springer, pp. 52-78.

Matthews, Steve. 2008. Identity and Information Technology, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 142-160.

Thorseth, May. 2011. Virtuality and Trust in Broadened Thinking Online, in Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 162-177.

Nissenbaum, Helen. 2005. Where computer security meets national security? Ethics and Information Technology. Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 61-73.

Pettit, Philip. 2008. Trust, Reliance, and the Internet, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 161-174.

  • Seminar, 5th of December “Informational privacy, surveillance, and databases”

Floridi, Luciano. 2005. The Ontological Interpretation of Informational Privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, pp. 185-200.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2008. Privacy Versus Security: Why Privacy is Not an Absolute Value or Right, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, pp. 862-922.

Introna, Lucas D. 1997. Privacy and the Computer: Why We Need Privacy in the Information Society, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 259-275.

Nissenbaum, Helen. 2010. Privacy in Context. Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life. Part III The Framework of Contextual Integrity, Chapter 7. Contexts, Informational Norms, Actors, Attributes, and Transmission Principles. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, pp. 127-157.

Rössler, Beate. 2001. The Value of Privacy. Informational Privacy: Limits to Knowledge. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp Verlag. pp. 111-140.

  • Seminar, 5th of December “Intellectual property, the digital divide and other digital rights”

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2007. The Information Gap, the Digital Divide, and the Obligations of Affluent Nations, International Review of Information Ethics, Vol. 7, pp. 1-14.

Hoven, Jeroen van den. 2005. E-democracy, E-Contestation and the Monitorial Citizen. Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No 2, pp 51-59.

Moore, Adam D. 2008. Personality-Based, Rule Utilitarian, and Lockean Justifications for Intellectual Property, in Kenneth E. Himma & Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2008. The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: pp. 105-130.

Sunstein, Cass R. 2008. Democracy and the Internet, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 93-110.

Weckert, John. 2000. What is so bad about Internet content regulation? Ethics and Information Technology. Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 105-111.

Suggested further readings:

Bijker, Wiebe E.; Thomas P. Huges & Trevor Pinch (eds.). 1987. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press.

Britz, Johannes J. and Peter J. Lor. 2003. A Moral Reflection on the Information Flow From South to North: an African Perspective, Libri: International Journal of Libraries and Information Services, Vol. 53, Vol. 3, pp. 160-173.

Borgmann, Albert. 1999. Holding onto Reality: The Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Brey, Philip. 2008. Do We Have Moral Duties Towards Information Objects?, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, pp. 109-114.

Bynum, Terrell Ward. 2006. Flourishing Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 157-173.

Capurro, Rafael. 2005. Privacy. An Intercultural Perspective, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 37-47.

Coleman, Stephen. 2006. E-mail, terrorism, and the right to privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 17-27.

Dreyfus, Hubert L. 1992. What Computers Still Can’t Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Dreyfus, Hubert L. [2001] 2009. On the Internet, 2nd Edition. London & New York: Routledge.

Ess, Charles. 2006. Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 215-226.

Ess, Charles & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang.

Floridi, Luciano. 1999. Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. London & New York: Routledge.

Floridi, Luciano. 2006. Four challenges for a theory of informational privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 109-119.

Floridi, Luciano. 2010. Information: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Floridi, Luciano (ed.). 2004. The Blackwell Guide to Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Floridi, Luciano (ed.). 2010. The Cambridge Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Heidegger, Martin. 1977. The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays, tr. William Lovitt. New York & London: Garland Publishing, Inc.

Heilbroner, Robert L. 1967. Do Machines Make History?, in Deborah G. Johnson and James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, pp. 97-107.

Heim, Michael. 1993. The Metaphysics of Virtual Reality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2004. There’s Something About Mary: The Moral Value of Things qua Information Objects, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 6, No. 3, pp. 145-159.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2008. Privacy Versus Security: Why Privacy is Not an Absolute Value or Right, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, pp. 862-922.

Himma, Kenneth Einar & Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2008. The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Hongladaram, Soraj & Charles Ess (eds.). 2007. Information Technology Ethics: Cultural Perspectives. Hershey: Idea Group Reference.

Hovem, Jeroen van den & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Introna, Lucas D. 2002. The (im)possibility of ethics in the information age, Information and Organization, Vol. 12, Vol. 2, pp. 71-84.

Introna, Lucas D. and Helen Nissenbaum. 2000. Shaping the web: Why the politics of search engines matters, The Information Society, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 169-185.

Introna, Lucas D. and Martin Brigham. 2007. Reconsidering community and the stranger in the age of virtuality, Society and Business Review, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 166-178.

Johnson, Deborah G. & James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Latour, Bruno. 1992. Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts, in Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law (eds.). 1992. Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, pp. 225-258.

Lessig, Lawrence. 1999. Code is Law, in Deborah G. Johnson and James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, pp. 181-194.

Marx, Gary T. 2001. Identity and Anonymity: Some Conceptual Distinctions and Issues in Research, in Jane Caplan & John Torpey (eds.). 2001. Documenting Individual Identity: The Development of State Practices in the Modern World. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 301-328. (Online: http://web.mit.edu/gtmarx/www/identity.html)

Mitcham, Carl. 1994. Thinking Through Technology: The Path between Engineering and Philosophy. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Mooradian, Norman. 2006. Virtual Reality, Ontology, and Value, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 673-690.

Moor, James H. 1999. Just Consequentialism and Computing, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 65-69.

Pinch, Trevor J. & Wiebe Bijker. 1987. The Social Construction of Facts and Artifacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology Might Benefit Each Other, in Wiebe E. Bijker, Thomas P. Huges and Trevor Pinch (eds.). 1987. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, pp. 17-50.

Shannon, Claude E.; Warren Weaver. 1964. The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Urbana: The University of Illinois Press.

Sloman, Aaron. 1978. The Computer Revolution in Philosophy: Philosophy, Science, and Models of Mind. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.

Tavani, Herman T. 1999. Informational privacy, data mining, and the Internet, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 137-145.

Tavani, Herman T. 2004. Genomic research and data-mining technology: Implications for personal privacy and informed consent, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 15-28.

Tavani, Herman T. 2008. Floridi’s ontological theory of informational privacy: Some implications and challenges, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, pp. 155-166.

Turkle, Sherry. [1984] 2005. The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit, 20th Anniversary Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Turkle, Sherry. 1995. Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Vedder, Anton. 1999. KDD: The Challenge to Individualism, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 275-281.

Wiener, Norbert. [1948] 1961. Cybernetics: or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, 2nd Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Wiener, Norbert. [1950] 1989. The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society. London: Free Association Books.

http://ee.linkedin.com/pub/katrin-laas-mikko/2b/827/224
This entry was posted in Announcements, Intensive courses, Seminars, Symposia and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.