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Arizona State University

Arizona State University (commonly referred to as ASU or Arizona State) is a national space-grant institution and public metropolitan research university located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area of the U.S. state of Arizona. It is the largest public university in the United States by enrollment.

Founded in 1885 as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory, the school came under control of the Arizona Board of Regents in 1945 and was renamed Arizona State College. A 1958 statewide ballot measure gave the university its present name.

In 1994 ASU was classified as a Research I institute; thus, making Arizona State one of the newest major research universities (public or private) in the nation. Arizona State’s mission is to create a model of the “New American University” whose efficacy is measured “by those it includes and how they succeed, not by those it excludes”.

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Una estátua conmemora la hambruna en la que murieron millones de ucranianos. A statue of a girl during the Ukrainian famine, in which someone has placed wheat and flowers.

Hambruna, subyugación y desastre nuclear: cómo la experiencia soviética sembró el resentimiento de los ucranianos hacia Rusia

Ucrania, una vez conocida como el granero de Europa, sufrió una hambruna terrible bajo Stalin. Este desastre, entre otros, perjudica las relaciones modernas entre los dos países vecinos.
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, right, signed decrees recognizing the independence of the Donetsk and Lugansk People’s Republics on February 21, 2022. Alexei Nikolsky/Russian Presidential Press and Information Office/TASS via Getty Images

Ukraine crisis: Putin recognizes breakaway regions, Biden orders limited sanctions – 5 essential reads

Russia sent troops to two Moscow-allied breakaway regions in Ukraine, after President Vladimir Putin recognized the regions’ independence. Five stories provide background to the growing conflict.
An Orthodox priest takes part in a rally in protest against an official visit of Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople to Kyiv in August 2021. Anna Marchenko\TASS via Getty Images

Why church conflict in Ukraine reflects historic Russian-Ukrainian tensions

The current split in Ukrainian Orthodoxy reflects a fundamental question: Are Ukrainians and Russians one people or two separate nations?
A statue commemorating the Ukrainian famine, in which millions died. Ukrainian Presidency/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Famine, subjugation and nuclear fallout: How Soviet experience helped sow resentment among Ukrainians toward Russia

Ukraine was once known as the breadbasket of Europe, yet it suffered a devastating famine as a result of collectivist plans. That and other Soviet-era grievances have bred resentment toward Russia.
The compact olfactory system provides a more accessible way to study the brain as a whole. Esther Kok/EyeEm via Getty Images

From odor to action – how smells are processed in the brain and influence behavior

Understanding how the brain translates smells into behavior change can help advance search and rescue technology and treatments for neurological conditions.
Most U.S.-grown soybeans are genetically modified, so products containing them may be required to carry the new ‘bioengineered’ label. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

What is bioengineered food? An agriculture expert explains

There’s a new label on many US food products – here’s what it means and who pushed to add it.
One ‘mechanical tree’ is about 1,000 times faster at removing carbon dioxide from air than a natural tree. The first is to start operating in Arizona in 2022. Illustration via Arizona State University

These machines scrub greenhouse gases from the air – an inventor of direct air capture technology shows how it works

Klaus Lackner is finding new ways to cut the technology’s high costs and energy demand, and he’s about to launch the first ‘mechanical tree’.
A new study identifies significant language barriers between doctors and their patients. ljubaphoto/E+ via Getty Images

Confused by what your doctor tells you? A new study discovers how communication gaps between doctors and patients can be cured

Communication breakdowns between doctors and their patients have real-life consequences and can result in poorer health outcomes and sicker patients.
Vladimir Putin at a concert in March 2021 marking the seventh anniversary of its annexation of Crimea. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Image

Why Putin has such a hard time accepting Ukrainian sovereignty

As Ukraine wrestles with the latest threat from its larger neighbor, two scholars explain how the independent country is often viewed as part of a greater Russia – and why that inflames tensions.
Working from home comes with many distractions. MoMoProductions/Digital Vision via Getty Images

Surveys of scientists show women and young academics suffered most during pandemic and may face long-term career consequences

Many scientists stuck at home during university closures dealt with increased domestic responsibilities. But some groups had it worse than others.
Dancing with danger. West Side Story/Amblin

‘West Side Story’ may be timeless – but life in gangs today differs drastically from when the Jets and Sharks ruled the streets

Gangs have changed in the decades since ‘West Side Story’ first came out – they are deadlier, and their demographics are different – as are the means law enforcement use to control them.

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