Intensive Course. Human Rights: Ideas and Problems

Master’s Level Intensive Course

November 10-15, 2014 | Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences (LEU) | 5 ECTS

Duration: 5 days

Teachers Henry Alexander Henrysson (University of Iceland) | Rasa Askinyte-Degesiene (Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences) | Pascale Mompoint-Gaillard (Council of Europe) | Renata Bikauskaite (Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences).

Course description: The main purpose of this course is to introduce the most significant philosophical aspects of human rights discourse, to examine the universality of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and to scrutinize human rights issues from different cultural perspectives. Firstly, historical circumstances and major stages of development of human rights theories will be presented. Secondly, the scope of validity of the key concepts will be analyzed: Are these concepts universal? In addition to the UN document, students will get acquainted with the alternative codes, such as the Universal Islamic Declaration of Human Rights and the Asian Human Rights Charter (pdf), and also with some attempts to formulate a corresponding universal declaration of responsibilities. Thirdly, practical applicability of the general principles will be discussed.

It will be a five-day intensive course consisting of two lectures and two seminars each day. The students will be asked to read the most important documents and selected articles that give an overview of the historical developments and the most recent debates in the philosophy of human rights. The reading list will be distributed among participating students three weeks before the course begins. Students are encouraged to suggest additional reading for the course if they think that it would be beneficial to other students or the objectives of the course in general. It is a Master’s level intensive course.

Grading: After successful completion of the course, students will be awarded 5 ECTS. Assessment is based on presentation (50%) and an essay (50%) that has to be submitted no later than one month after the final day of the course. The topic of the essay will be discussed and decided with the teachers during the course. The final written essay should deal with a relevant topic chosen by the student, and should not exceed 10 pages in length.

Reading list: The reading list will be distributed among participating students three weeks before the course begins.

Course schedule:

Monday, 10th of November

12.10-13.40 (lecture). Henry Alexander Henrysson | Human Rights: The Historical Context.

14.00-15.30 (lecture). Henry Alexander Henrysson | The Conceptual Framework of Human Rights. What is the difference between a legal, a political and an ethical conception of human rights?

15.50-17.20 (seminar). Henry Alexander Henrysson | The Conceptual Framework of Human Rights.

Tuesday, 11th of November

12.10-13.40 (lecture). Henry Alexander Henrysson | International Human Rights. Focus on UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights – its origin and role as a contemporary point of reference.

14.00-15.30 (lecture). Henry Alexander Henrysson | Value Pluralism: A Threat to Modern Conceptions of Human Rights?

15.50-17.20 (seminar). Henry Alexander Henrysson | Is there a possibility of prioritizing different human values?

17.40-19.10 Students’ presentations

Wednesday, 12th of November

12.10-13.40 (lecture). Renata Bikauskaite | Developement of Women’s Rights Discource

14.00-15.30 (lecture). Renata Bikauskaite | From Women’s Rights to Human Rights

15.50-17.20 (seminar). Rasa Askinyte-Degesiene | Human Rights: difference between ideal and practical? (part 1)

17.40-19.10 Students’ presentations

Thursday, 13th of November

10-11:30 (lecture). Renata Bikauskaite | Considerations on Moral Value of Animals in Western Philosophy (part 1)

12-13:30 (lecture). Renata Bikauskaite | Considerations on Moral Value of Animals in Western Philosophy (part 2)

15.50-17.20 (seminar). Rasa Askinyte-Degesiene | Human Rights: difference between ideal and practical? (part 2)

17.40-19.10 Students’ presentations

Friday, 14th of November

12.10-13.40 (lecture). Pascale Mompoint-Gaillard | Role of education for the promotion of human rights. Reflection of how schooling, higher education and non-formal learning can contribute to the development of democratic values.

14.00-15.30 (lecture). Pascale Mompoint-Gaillard | Internet and Democracy: Balance of Control and Freedom. Concept of citizenship in different contexts and communities, especially in its web 2.0 extensions. Cognitive and social competences that are necessary today for being an active and participatory citizen.

15.50-17.20 (seminar). Pascale Mompoint-Gaillard | Social justice: How should we cope with inequalities?

17.40-19.10 Students’ presentations.

Posted in Intensive courses, Seminars, Symposia | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Tenth Annual Estonian Philosophy Conference (EFAK X): DISAGREEMENTS

EFAK X: DISAGREEMENTS
Tartu, September 25-27, 2014

EFAK X, the Tenth Annual Estonian Philosophy Conference, will take place in Tartu, from September 25 to September 27, 2014, organized by the Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics of the University of Tartu. This year’s topic is “disagreements”.

Confirmed Keynote Speaker: Prof. Esa Diaz Leon (University of Manitoba/University of Barcelona)

Call for contributed papers: Organizers invite contributions to EFAK X: Disagreements. We particularly welcome contributions on the topic of disagreements, but will also consider philosophical papers in all areas of philosophy.

EFAK X will have three different kinds of talk:
* at least two invited keynotes (45 minutes presentation + 30 minutes discussion).
* contributed plenary talks (35 minutes presentation + 25 minutes discussion)
* and contributed parallel talks (20 minutes presentation + 10 minutes discussion)

The acceptance of contributed papers and the division between contributed parallel and contributed plenary talks will be decided on the basis of blind peer review by the scientific committee. The idea is that a small number of the very best papers will get more time for presentation and discussion.

GUIDELINES FOR THE SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS
Abstracts must be written in English or Estonian and prepared for blind review. Please submit a relatively detailed abstract of up to 800 words, outlining not only the position defended but also the argument for that position. Abstracts should indicate the title of the paper and the area(s) of philosophy to which it belongs. Abstracts should have the following format: Times New Roman, font size 10, 1,5 line spacing. Submissions should be in doc format (not pdf) and sent to efakx@ut.ee. Please include your contact details and your affiliation in the main body of the email.

The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2014. Notification of acceptance is expected by September 1.

Scientific Committee: Vivian Bohl | Alex Davies | Thomas Lott | Kristi Lõuk | Ave Mets | Francesco Orsi | Edit Talpsepp

Local Organization: Daniel Cohnitz | Triin Paaver

Website: click HERE.

Posted in Conferences | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Call for Papers: Politics without Borders: A cross-disciplinary exploration of the challenges facing a globalised world

Students and young researchers associated with BALPHIN are invited to participate in the second annual Nottingham Postgraduate Conference

Politics without Borders: A cross-disciplinary exploration of the challenges facing a globalized world

on 12 June 2014 ,Engineering and Sciences Learning Center,

University Park, University of Nottingham

The School of Politics and International Relations is hosting an international interdisciplinary postgraduate conference on:

  • International relations
  • International political economy
  • Political theory and ideology
  • British politics

Keynote speaker: Professor Gerry Stoker (Professor of Governance & Director of the Centre for Citizenship, Globalization and Governance, University of Southampton).

Abstracts are now being accepted from those wishing to deliver a paper at the conference.  Proposals (200-300 words) should include:

Title of paper, full name(s), current position, an email address, a single page sample bibliography and at least 3 keywords that best describe the subject of the submission.

Organizers welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers and practitioners.

Submissions should be sent by 28 February 2014.

For full details please visit Call for Papers page.

Posted in Announcements, Conferences | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Intensive Course: Pictorial Experience: A Philosophical Approach to Virtual Reality | UH

Master’s Level Intensive Course

May 12  – 16, 2014 | University of Helsinki | ECTS: 5

Duration: 5 days

Students: 24 (max)

Teachers: Jūratė Baranova (Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences) | Laura Junutytė (Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences) | Liv Hausken (University of Oslo) | Regina-Nino Kurg (Tallinn University) | Kārlis Vērpe (University of Liepaja)

Registration: contact Regina-Nino Kurg via reginanino@yahoo.com

Purpose of the course: The aim of the course is to introduce theories of pictorial experience in contemporary philosophy. The main focus is on the concepts of ‘picture’ and ‘image’.

Course description: After W. J. T. Mitchell introduced the idea of a “pictorial turn” in the humanities in 1992, the understanding of the role of pictures and images in our everyday life has become a central topic in many philosophical debates. Although it is evident that we are surrounded by images more than ever before in the history of humankind, we still do not have a sufficient understanding of what pictures are, how pictures affect their perceivers, what are the adequate interpretative schemes of pictures, how pictures function in both aesthetic and non-aesthetic contexts, etc.
The course is divided into five parts. The main concepts discussed during the course are the ‘image’ and ‘picture’. On the first day, the emphasis is on the pictorial experience of cinematic images that is explained from the perspective of Gilles Deleuze’s film theory. Accordingly, the notions of the ‘movement-image’, ‘action-image’, ‘fact-image’ and many others are discussed. The main topic of the second day is the process of making paintings, e.g., how the painter makes invisible forces visible in a picture. On the third day, the emphasis is on the photographic portraits. In connection with this, two cases will be discussed: biometric passport photography and cognitive brain imaging. The main topic of the fourth day is the experience of seeing something in a picture. Here Richard Wollheim’s and Edmund Husserl’s theories of seeing-in are examined. The same topic will be continued on the fifth day with emphasis on the difference between seeing something in reality and seeing it in a picture. The main focus here is on theories according to which we see things themselves in pictures and not images of them.

Grading: The course is taught in the form of lectures and seminars where students are expected to read articles and excerpts from selected texts. Students will also watch an Italian Neorealism movie beforehand (see the Reading list). Students are graded on the basis of active participation in the lectures and seminars (20%), a student presentation (40%) and a written text (40%). The course consists of five days of classes organized around various topics of pictorial experience: two lectures in the morning and an afternoon seminar with students’ presentations every day. Each student is expected to make a presentation based on one of the texts from the reading list (a text will be assigned to the student). The final written essay should deal with a relevant topic chosen by the student, and should not exceed 10 pages in length. The topic of the written text will be discussed and decided with teachers during the course.

Schedule:
Monday, 12th of May

10:00-11:30 (lecture)
“Film theory: from Bazin to Deleuze” (Jūratė Baranova)

12:00-13:30 (lecture)
“Gilles Deleuze: Cinema of fear” (Jūratė Baranova)

Lunch

15:00-17:00 (seminar and students’ presentations)
“André Bazin and Gilles Deleuze: Two approaches to Italian Neorealism”

Tuesday, 13th of May
10:00-11:30 (lecture)
“Alternative Overcoming of Representation: Francis Bacon” (Laura Junutytė)

12:00-13:30 (lecture)
“Deterritorialising Cosmos of Paul Klee” (Laura Junutytė)

Lunch

15:00-17:00 (seminar and students’ presentations)
“How can one make invisible forces visible?”

Wednesday, 14th of May
10:00-11:30 (lecture)
“’If you look like your passport photo, you are too sick to travel.’ Biometric passport photography” (Liv Hausken)

12:00-13:30 (lecture)
“Imaging the brain in a visual culture of portrait photography” (Liv Hausken)

Lunch

15:00-17:00 (seminar and students’ presentations)
“The photographic portrait: conflicting discourses”

Thursday, 15th of May
10:00-11:30 (lecture)
“Edmund Husserl’s theory of image consciousness” (Regina-Nino Kurg)

12:00-13:30 (lecture)
“Richard Wollheim’s theory of ‘seeing-in’” (Regina-Nino Kurg)

Lunch

15:00-17:00 (seminar and students’ presentations)
“Theories of ‘seeing-in’”

Friday, 16th of May
10:00-11:30 (lecture)
“Kendall Walton’s transparency thesis” (Kārlis Vērpe)

12:00-13:30 (lecture)
“Seeing things themselves” (Kārlis Vērpe)

Lunch

15:00-17:00 (seminar and students’ presentations)
“The difference between seeing something in reality and seeing it in a picture.”

Reading list:

Seminar, 13th of May | “André Bazin and Gilles Deleuze: Two Approaches towards Italian Neorealism”

Cardullo, B. (Ed.). (2011). André Bazin and Italian Neorealism. Continuum International Publishing, pp 42-73

Deleuze, G. (1986). „The Crisis of Action-Image“. In Cinema 1: The Movement-image. London: Athlone Press, pp 197-215

Deleuze, G. (1989). „Beyond the Movement Image“. In Cinema 2: The time-image. University of Minnesota Press, pp 1-24

Movies:
Obligatory: Vittorio de Sica, “The Bicycle Thief” (1948)

Optional:
R. Rossellini: “Stromboli” (1950), “Europa 51” (1952), “Rome, Open City” (1945); Michelangelo Antonioni: “The Eclipse” (1962), “The Adventure” (1960), “Story of a Love affair” (1950); Luchino Visconti “Obsession” (1943), “The Earth Trembles” (1948), “Rocco and His brothers” (1960); Vittorio De Sica, “Umberto D.” (1952)

Seminar, 13th of May | “How can one make invisible forces visible?”

Deleuze, G. (2003). “Painting and Sensation” In Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Continuum, pp 34-43

Deleuze, G. (2003). “Painting Forces” In Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Continuum, pp 56-64

Deleuze, G. (2003). “The Painting before Painting” In Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Continuum, pp 86-98

Deleuze, G. (2003). “The Diagram” In Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Continuum, pp 99-110

Deleuze, G., & Guattari, F. (2005). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. University of Minnesota Press, pp 337-350

Seminar, 14th of May | “The photographic portrait: conflicting discourses”

Freeland, C. (2007). “Portraits in painting and photography” Philosophical Studies, 135(1), pp 95–109

Wilson, D. M. (2012). “Facing the Camera: Self-portraits of Photographers as Artists” Journal of Aesthetics & Art Criticism, 70(1), pp 56–66

Sontag, S. (2005). “The Image-World.” In On Photography. Farrar, Straus and Giroux,
pp 119-141

Seminar, 15th of May | “Theories of Seeing-in”

Wollheim, R. (1980). “Seeing-as, seeing-in, and pictorial representation.” In Art and Its Objects: Second Edition with Six Supplementary Essays. Cambridge University Press, pp 205-226

Brough, John. (1992). “Some Husserlian Comments on Depiction and Art”
American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, LXVI (2, Spring), pp 241-259

Sonesson, G. (1989). Pictorial concepts: inquiries into the semiotic heritage and its relevance to the interpretation of the visual world. Lund University Press, pp 270-282

Seminar, 16th of May | “The difference between seeing something in reality and seeing it in a picture.”

Walton, K. L. (1984). “Transparent Pictures: On the Nature of Photographic Realism”
Critical Inquiry, 11(2), pp 246–277

Wiesing, L. (2011). “Pause of Participation. On the Function of Artificial Presence”
Research in Phenomenology, 41(2), pp 238–252

Sartre, J. P. (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. London: Routledge, pp 4-24

Posted in Intensive courses, Seminars, Symposia | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Jobs for Philosophers

The updated portal Jobs for Philosophers (found at philjobs.org) was launched some time ago.

Jointly operated by the PhilPapers team and the APA, PhilJobs: Jobs for Philosophers (JFP) aims to bring together the best features of PhilJobs and Jobs for Philosophers. It is a freely available, comprehensive, international listing of jobs relevant to philosophers of any level of training.

JFP is an international project with support from several organizations. International sponsors include the University of Western Ontario (Canada), the Institute of Philosophy (UK), and the Australian National University.

All institutions worldwide with jobs in philosophy are encouraged to advertise them on PhilJobs: JFP, and all jobseekers in philosophy are encouraged to use the site.

For more information please visit philjobs.org.

Posted in Announcements | Tagged | Leave a comment

Intensive Course: The Philosophy of Information: Computer and Information Technology Ethics (Master Level) | TLU

December 2 – 6, 2013 | Tallinn University | ECTS: 5

Duration: 5 days

Students: 24 (max)

Teachers: Oliver Laas (Tallinn University) | Katrin Laas-Mikko (University of Tartu)

Registration: contact Regina-Nino Kurg via reginanino@yahoo.com.

Purpose of the course: The primary goal of the intensive course for Master Level students is to introduce them to philosophical issues surrounding information and communication technologies in light of current theoretical frameworks with a special emphasis on ethics.

Course description: Information and communication technologies have generated a complex of social, ethical, and cultural concerns. Current intensified technological development tends to outpace policymakers ability to regulate the newly emerging practices. This creates policy vacuums, many of which involve conceptual muddles, that is, confusions about the central notions involved in conceptualizing the vexing issues at hand. Hence an understanding of key concepts like technology, information, virtuality, informational privacy, intellectual property, and online identity is needed. Also relevant are overarching questions about the relationship between technology, society and culture. The course is designed to give an insight into current philosophical discussions of information and communication technologies from various perspectives, and to provide students with the basic vocabulary for tackling these topics in their own work.

Grading: The course is held in the form of lectures and seminars where students are expected to read articles and excerpts from selected texts. Students are graded on the basis of active participation in the lectures and seminars (20%), presentation (40%) and a written text (40%). The course consists of five days of classes organized around various topics in the philosophy of information and the ethics of information technologies technologies and including lectures, seminars and student presentations as specified in the timetable that appears below. Each student is expected to make a brief written summary and presentation of their chosen text along with questions and counterarguments for the active deliberation of all participants. The final written essay should deal with a relevant topic chosen by the student, and should not exceed 10 pages in length.

Timetable:

Monday, 2nd  of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “History of Information and Computer Ethics, and Some Basic Concepts —Information, Virtuality, Technology and Culture”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Drivers for Philosophical and Ethical Questions: Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cloud Computing etc.”

Lunch

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “The philosophy of information: some basic issues”

Tuesday, 3rd of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Metaphysical Issues and Foundational Debates: Ontology, Methodology, and Intercultural Information Ethics”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Ethical Risks of Emerging Technologies: Moral Reasoning in Practical Context”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Metaphysical issues and foundational debates in information and computer ethics”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Wednesday, 4th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Identity, Community, and Trust in Democracy”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Between Chaos and Order: Cybersecurity” (security as paradigm, crime, cyberwar/terrorism, hackitivism)

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Online communities, identity, trust and security”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Thursday, 5th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Privacy and Information Technology: Various Perspectives”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Balancing Privacy Against Other Values: Cases of Surveillance Technologies”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Informational privacy, surveillance, and databases”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Friday, 6th of December

10-11:30 (lecture)

Oliver Laas: “Intellectual Property, Distributive Justice and the Digital Divide”

12-13:30 (lecture)

Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Internet and Democracy: Balance of Control and Freedom.”

15-16:30 (seminar)

Oliver Laas & Katrin Laas-Mikko: “Intellectual property, the digital divide and other digital rights”

16:30-17:30 (students’ presentations)

Seminar texts:

  • Seminar, 2nd of December: “The philosophy of information: some basic issues”

Floridi, Luciano. 2004. Information, in Luciano Floridi (ed.). 2004. The Blackwell Guide to Computing and Information. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., pp. 40-61.

Moor, James H. 1985. What is Computer Ethics?, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 263-275. (Online: http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~rogaway/classes/188/spring06/papers/moor.html)

Søraker, Johnny Hartz. 2011. Virtual Entities, Environments, Worlds and Reality: Suggested Definitions and Taxonomy, in Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 44-72.

Stahl, B. C. (2011) “What does the Future Hold? A Critical Review of Emerging Information and Communications Technologies and their Social Consequences” In Chiasson, Mike, Henfridsson, Ola, Karsten, Helena and DeGross, Janice I (2011). Researching the Future in Information Systems. IFIP WG 8.2 Working Conference, Future IS, Turku, Finland, June 6-8, 2011, Proceedings. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 59-76.

  • Seminar, 3rd of December “Metaphysical issues and foundational debates in information and computer ethics”

Brey, Philip A. 2012. Anticipating ethical issues in emerging IT. Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 305-317.

Capurro, Rafael. 2006. Towards an Ontological Foundation of Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 175-186.

Ess, Charles. 2006. Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 215-226.

Floridi, Luciano. 2008. Information Ethics: Its Nature and Scope, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 40-65.

Gert, Bernard. 2004. Common Morality and Computing. In Richard A. Spinello and Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2004. Readings in Cyberethics (2nd edition). Jones and Bartlett Publishers, pp. 96-106.

  • Seminar, 4th of December “Online communities, identity, trust and security”

Brunst, W. Phillip. 2010. Terrorism and the Internet: New Threats Posed by Cyberterrorism and Terrorist Use of the Internet, in. Marianne Wade and Almir Maljević. A War on Terror? The European Stance on a New Threat, Changing Laws and Human Rights Implications. New York: Springer, pp. 52-78.

Matthews, Steve. 2008. Identity and Information Technology, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 142-160.

Thorseth, May. 2011. Virtuality and Trust in Broadened Thinking Online, in Charles Ess & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang, pp. 162-177.

Nissenbaum, Helen. 2005. Where computer security meets national security? Ethics and Information Technology. Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 61-73.

Pettit, Philip. 2008. Trust, Reliance, and the Internet, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 161-174.

  • Seminar, 5th of December “Informational privacy, surveillance, and databases”

Floridi, Luciano. 2005. The Ontological Interpretation of Informational Privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, pp. 185-200.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2008. Privacy Versus Security: Why Privacy is Not an Absolute Value or Right, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, pp. 862-922.

Introna, Lucas D. 1997. Privacy and the Computer: Why We Need Privacy in the Information Society, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 259-275.

Nissenbaum, Helen. 2010. Privacy in Context. Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life. Part III The Framework of Contextual Integrity, Chapter 7. Contexts, Informational Norms, Actors, Attributes, and Transmission Principles. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, pp. 127-157.

Rössler, Beate. 2001. The Value of Privacy. Informational Privacy: Limits to Knowledge. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp Verlag. pp. 111-140.

  • Seminar, 5th of December “Intellectual property, the digital divide and other digital rights”

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2007. The Information Gap, the Digital Divide, and the Obligations of Affluent Nations, International Review of Information Ethics, Vol. 7, pp. 1-14.

Hoven, Jeroen van den. 2005. E-democracy, E-Contestation and the Monitorial Citizen. Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No 2, pp 51-59.

Moore, Adam D. 2008. Personality-Based, Rule Utilitarian, and Lockean Justifications for Intellectual Property, in Kenneth E. Himma & Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2008. The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: pp. 105-130.

Sunstein, Cass R. 2008. Democracy and the Internet, in Jeroen van den Hoven & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 93-110.

Weckert, John. 2000. What is so bad about Internet content regulation? Ethics and Information Technology. Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 105-111.

Suggested further readings:

Bijker, Wiebe E.; Thomas P. Huges & Trevor Pinch (eds.). 1987. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press.

Britz, Johannes J. and Peter J. Lor. 2003. A Moral Reflection on the Information Flow From South to North: an African Perspective, Libri: International Journal of Libraries and Information Services, Vol. 53, Vol. 3, pp. 160-173.

Borgmann, Albert. 1999. Holding onto Reality: The Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Brey, Philip. 2008. Do We Have Moral Duties Towards Information Objects?, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, pp. 109-114.

Bynum, Terrell Ward. 2006. Flourishing Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 157-173.

Capurro, Rafael. 2005. Privacy. An Intercultural Perspective, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 37-47.

Coleman, Stephen. 2006. E-mail, terrorism, and the right to privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 17-27.

Dreyfus, Hubert L. 1992. What Computers Still Can’t Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Dreyfus, Hubert L. [2001] 2009. On the Internet, 2nd Edition. London & New York: Routledge.

Ess, Charles. 2006. Ethical Pluralism and Global Information Ethics, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 215-226.

Ess, Charles & May Thorseth (eds.) 2011. Trust and Virtual Worlds: Contemporary Perspectives. New York: Peter Lang.

Floridi, Luciano. 1999. Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. London & New York: Routledge.

Floridi, Luciano. 2006. Four challenges for a theory of informational privacy, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 109-119.

Floridi, Luciano. 2010. Information: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Floridi, Luciano (ed.). 2004. The Blackwell Guide to Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Floridi, Luciano (ed.). 2010. The Cambridge Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Heidegger, Martin. 1977. The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays, tr. William Lovitt. New York & London: Garland Publishing, Inc.

Heilbroner, Robert L. 1967. Do Machines Make History?, in Deborah G. Johnson and James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, pp. 97-107.

Heim, Michael. 1993. The Metaphysics of Virtual Reality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2004. There’s Something About Mary: The Moral Value of Things qua Information Objects, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 6, No. 3, pp. 145-159.

Himma, Kenneth Einar. 2008. Privacy Versus Security: Why Privacy is Not an Absolute Value or Right, San Diego Law Review, Vol. 44, pp. 862-922.

Himma, Kenneth Einar & Herman T. Tavani (eds.). 2008. The Handbook of Information and Computer Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Hongladaram, Soraj & Charles Ess (eds.). 2007. Information Technology Ethics: Cultural Perspectives. Hershey: Idea Group Reference.

Hovem, Jeroen van den & John Weckert (eds.). 2008. Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Introna, Lucas D. 2002. The (im)possibility of ethics in the information age, Information and Organization, Vol. 12, Vol. 2, pp. 71-84.

Introna, Lucas D. and Helen Nissenbaum. 2000. Shaping the web: Why the politics of search engines matters, The Information Society, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 169-185.

Introna, Lucas D. and Martin Brigham. 2007. Reconsidering community and the stranger in the age of virtuality, Society and Business Review, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 166-178.

Johnson, Deborah G. & James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Latour, Bruno. 1992. Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts, in Wiebe E. Bijker and John Law (eds.). 1992. Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, pp. 225-258.

Lessig, Lawrence. 1999. Code is Law, in Deborah G. Johnson and James M. Wetmore (eds.). 2009. Technology and Society: Building Our Sociotechnical Future . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, pp. 181-194.

Marx, Gary T. 2001. Identity and Anonymity: Some Conceptual Distinctions and Issues in Research, in Jane Caplan & John Torpey (eds.). 2001. Documenting Individual Identity: The Development of State Practices in the Modern World. Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 301-328. (Online: http://web.mit.edu/gtmarx/www/identity.html)

Mitcham, Carl. 1994. Thinking Through Technology: The Path between Engineering and Philosophy. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Mooradian, Norman. 2006. Virtual Reality, Ontology, and Value, Metaphilosophy, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 673-690.

Moor, James H. 1999. Just Consequentialism and Computing, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 65-69.

Pinch, Trevor J. & Wiebe Bijker. 1987. The Social Construction of Facts and Artifacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology Might Benefit Each Other, in Wiebe E. Bijker, Thomas P. Huges and Trevor Pinch (eds.). 1987. The Social Construction of Technological Systems: New Directions in the Sociology and History of Technology. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, pp. 17-50.

Shannon, Claude E.; Warren Weaver. 1964. The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Urbana: The University of Illinois Press.

Sloman, Aaron. 1978. The Computer Revolution in Philosophy: Philosophy, Science, and Models of Mind. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press.

Tavani, Herman T. 1999. Informational privacy, data mining, and the Internet, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 137-145.

Tavani, Herman T. 2004. Genomic research and data-mining technology: Implications for personal privacy and informed consent, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 15-28.

Tavani, Herman T. 2008. Floridi’s ontological theory of informational privacy: Some implications and challenges, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, pp. 155-166.

Turkle, Sherry. [1984] 2005. The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit, 20th Anniversary Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Turkle, Sherry. 1995. Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Vedder, Anton. 1999. KDD: The Challenge to Individualism, Ethics and Information Technology, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 275-281.

Wiener, Norbert. [1948] 1961. Cybernetics: or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, 2nd Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Wiener, Norbert. [1950] 1989. The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society. London: Free Association Books.

http://ee.linkedin.com/pub/katrin-laas-mikko/2b/827/224
Posted in Announcements, Intensive courses, Seminars, Symposia | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

PPhil in Vilnius: 4 day. Farewell

Closing session:

Future of the project
Posted in Events | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

PPhil in Vilnius: 3 Day. Seminars II

Presentations:

11 valuable researches from PPhil members and friends

The third day consists from eleven different presentations from eleven different specialists. Here we move from Isaiah Berlin through the phenomenological and marxist approaches to the innovative concept of “playground” and philosophy of moral intuition.

List of videos:

1. Olli Loukola, University of Helsinki: “Commissioning a Taxi Driver: Of Philosophical Professionalism”
2. Liutauras Degėsys, Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences: “Philosophy of Education as Philosophy of Education of the Self”
3. Andrius Bielskis, Mykolas Romeris University: “The relevance of marxist theory of exploitation”
4. Francesco Orsi, University of Tartu: “Pure Evil”
5. Mikael M. Karlsson, University of Iceland: “Hypothetical and Categorical Imperatives”
6. Ernestas Jancenkas, Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences: “Praxeological Ethics of Private Property”
7. Simon Barker, Bifröst University: “Doxatic Divisions and the Praxical Value of Hermeneutic Understanding”
8. Tõnu Viik: Tallinn University: “A Phenomenological Reduction of the Patriotic Enjoyment”
9. Paul McLaughlin: University of Tartu: “Philosophical Reflections on the Banking Crisis”
10. Klemen Slabina, Tallinn University: “Playground: The Whereabouts of Our Wishes, Choices, and Decisions”
11. Student Prize Presentation – Gunnar Júlíus Guðmundsson, University of Iceland: “Moral Intuitions”

Posted in Events | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

PPhil in Vilnius: 2 day. Seminars

Seminars:

Presentations and discussions on the common topics

On the second day there were three seminars on the three different traditions of philosophy. Siobhan Kattago from Tallinn University presented concept of banality of evil of Hanna Arendt of continental tradition. Lars Hertzberg from Åbo Akademi University reconstructed late Ludwig Wittgenstein theory of the language games of analitical paradigm. And Geir Sigurðsson from University of Iceland revealed the basics of Chinese Philosophy.

List of videos:

Posted in Events | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

PPhil in Vilnius: 1 day. Retrospective

A few words about the past:

retrospective and self-reflection from the founders of the program


Creators of the program are talking about reasons why they decided to create international master program “Practical Philosophy: Theories of the good society” (PPhil), how it was organized, what problems they faced and finally they revealed why they decided to finish this project. Every presentation is a half-biographical story consisting from explanation of motives and values which stand behind the administrative job and of course remembering of the best moments of this project.

List of videos:

Posted in Events | Tagged , , | Leave a comment