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Boise State University

Boise State University is a public, metropolitan research university located in the heart of Idaho’s capital city. We offer an array of undergraduate and graduate degrees and experiences that foster student success, lifelong learning, community engagement, innovation and creativity.

Research and creative activities advance new knowledge and benefit students, the community, the state and the nation. As an integral part of its metropolitan environment, the university is engaged in professional and continuing education programming, policy issues, and promoting the region’s economic vitality and cultural enrichment.

Boise State University aspires to be a research university known for the finest undergraduate education in the region, and outstanding research and graduate programs. With its exceptional faculty, staff and student body – combined with its location in the heart of a thriving metropolitan area, the university will be viewed as an engine that drives the Idaho economy, providing significant return on public investment.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 98 articles

In a 1949 photograph, Mori works in his family’s nursery in San Leandro, Calif. Courtesy of Steven Y. Mori

Toshio Mori endured internment camps and overcame discrimination to become the first Japanese American to publish a book of fiction

On Dec. 2, 1941, a publication date was set for Mori’s first book. Five days later, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, upending the writer’s life and throwing the book’s publication into doubt.
Banana plantation workers in Panama find shade under a vehicle during a break. Jan Sochor/Latincontent/Getty Images

Heat waves hit the poor hardest – a new study calculates the rising impact on those least able to adapt to the warming climate

The risk from heat waves is about more than intensity – being able to cool off is essential, and that’s hard to find in many low-income areas of the world.
El ejército estadounidense realizando un ejercicio de entrenamiento militar para emergencias en Alemania el 27 de enero de 2022. Armin Weigel / Picture alliance via Getty Images

¿Por qué Joe Biden está enviando más tropas a Europa del Este?

El presidente estadounidense ha ordenado el despliegue de tres mil soldados más para apoyar a la OTAN en Europa del Este. Con ello, Biden se adentra tanto en un conflicto regional como en un territorio jurídico enmarañado.
The U.S. army conducts a military training exercise for emergencies in Germany on Jan. 27, 2022. Armin Weigel/picture alliance via Getty Images

Biden sending more troops to Eastern Europe – 3 key issues behind the decision

President Joe Biden is deploying 3,000 troops to support NATO in Eastern Europe. By doing so, Biden enters both a regional conflict and tangled legal territory.
Over there, over there (again). Omar Marques/Getty Images

The US military presence in Europe has been declining for 30 years – the current crisis in Ukraine may reverse that trend

The Pentagon has announced that as many as 8,500 troops have been put on standby to be deployed in Europe as a counter to the threat of the Russian military buildup on Ukraine’s eastern border.
U.S. Army soldiers walk to their C-17 cargo plane for departure on May 11, 2013, at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

After Afghanistan, US military presence abroad faces domestic and foreign opposition in 2022

If the United States expects to sustain its global influence, it will have to navigate increasing international and domestic pressure against its foreign military presence.
Para astronom telah menemukan cara untuk memperkirakan jumlah bintang di alam semesta. Comstock Images via Getty Images

Ada berapa banyak bintang di langit?

Secara mengejutkan, jumlah bintang di alam semesta diperkirakan dengan baik oleh para ilmuwan.
At least 13 former Trump administration officials, including Jared Kushner and Kayleigh McEnany, pictured here, violated the Hatch Act, according to a new federal investigation released Nov. 9, 2021. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

The Hatch Act, the law Trump deputies are said to have broken, requires government employees to work for the public interest, not partisan campaigns

More than a dozen Trump administration officials are said to have violated a federal law that bars federal employees from political campaigning. They weren’t the first to have run afoul of the law.
The $1 trillion bill was a heavy lift for Speaker Nancy Pelosi (center). Next up: the budget reconciliation bill known as Build Back Better. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Congress passes $1T infrastructure bill – but how does the government go about spending that much money?

The government uses a process called public procurement. A professor of public policy explains how the process works and how it is increasingly used to achieve social goals.
In some drought-stricken parts of the Southwest, water arrives by truck. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Avoiding water bankruptcy in the drought-troubled Southwest: What the US and Iran can learn from each other

Cities and farmers in the Southwest are resorting to unsustainable strategies to pull in more water. Iran has tried many of these strategies and shows how they can go wrong.
Astronomers have found a way to estimate the number of stars in the universe. Comstock Images via Getty Images

How many stars are there in space?

Scientists have a good estimate on the staggering number of stars in the universe.
Heat and dryness are leaving high mountain areas more vulnerable to forest fires. David McNew/Getty Images

Western fires are burning higher in the mountains and at unprecedented rates as the climate warms

As the risk of fires rises in areas once considered too wet to burn, it creates hazards for mountain communities and for downstream water supplies.
President Biden and Vice President Harris met on Feb. 12, 2021, with governors and mayors to discuss supporting them in the fight against COVID-19. Pete Marovich-Pool/Getty Images

The Trump administration feuded with state and local leaders over pandemic response – now the Biden administration is trying to turn back a page in history

People can die when the federal government doesn’t work well with state and local governments – the COVID-19 crisis showed that. But the Biden administration has signaled an openness to collaboration.

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