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Rutgers University - Newark

Rutgers University - Newark (RU-N) is a diverse, urban, public research university that is an anchor institution in New Jersey’s largest city and cultural capital. Nearly 11,500 students are currently enrolled at its 38-acre campus in a wide range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs offered through the College of Arts and Sciences; University College; the Graduate School; Rutgers Business School – Newark and New Brunswick; Rutgers Law School, Newark; the School of Criminal Justice; and the School of Public Affairs and Administration. An engine of discovery, innovation, and social mobility, RU-N has a remarkable legacy of producing high-impact scholarship that is connected to the great questions and challenges of the world. A pivotal strength is that RU-N brings an exceptional diversity of people to this work—students, faculty, staff, and community partners—increasing it innovation, creativity, engagement, and relevance for our time and the times ahead. For more information please visit www.newark.rutgers.edu.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 134 articles

A woman and child walk away from a damaged residential building in Kyiv, Ukraine, where a military shell allegedly hit on Feb. 25, 2022. Photo by DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images

Putin’s claims that Ukraine is committing genocide are baseless, but not unprecedented

Vladimir Putin has justified his invasion of Ukraine with baseless claims that Ukraine is committing genocide. It isn’t the first time a political leader has cried genocide for political means.
Ketanji Brown Jackson at her Senate Judiciary Committee hearing as a nominee to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Circuit, on April 28, 2021. Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)

Biden nominates Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court: 7 questions answered

A constitutional law professor provides insight on what Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, the first Black woman nominated to the Supreme Court, could mean for how that court works.
Students and teachers alike struggle with digital connectivity – but education is just one area in which technology matters. AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh

State efforts to close the K-12 digital divide may come up short

Claims the digital divide has been ‘closed’ don’t include the full picture of internet inequality in the United States.
If hope feels far-fetched this winter, you’re not alone. picture alliance via Getty Images

Tackling 2022 with hope: 5 essential reads

Five articles on the meanings of hope and how to think about resilience, healing and even joy in the midst of this winter’s bleakness.
CEO Warren Buffett was surrounded by press and fans when he arrived at Berkshire Hathaway’s 2019 annual shareholders meeting in Omaha, Nebraska, in May 2019. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Why Warren Buffett is a model for his billionaire peers

The investor has already given half of his $100 billion fortune to charity and he has pledged to disburse nearly all of the rest.
Legislation pending in Congress would contribute to reforming how police conduct themselves – but there’s a limit to what federal legislation can do. Seth Herald / AFP/Getty Images

Congress can’t do much about fixing local police – but it can tie strings to federal grants

While many in America are looking to Congress to pass police reform legislation, the federal government has almost no control over state and local police departments.
Fire a set of high-power lasers at a tiny speck of hydrogen isotopes and you can initiate nuclear fusion, the process that powers the Sun. National Ignition Facility

How much energy can people create at one time without losing control?

Scientists are working on ways to make lots of energy by converting matter into energy. The trick is keeping the process under control. One possibility is nuclear fusion – the Sun’s power source.
A woman reacts to the news that Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts in the murder of George Floyd. Scott Olson/Getty Images

Why this trial was different: Experts react to guilty verdict for Derek Chauvin

Scholars of policing, law, race and Minnesota history explain the landmark guilty verdicts handed down in the trial for the murder of George Floyd.
El sobrino de Floyd, Brandon Williams (centro), con el reverendo Al Sharpton (izquierda) fuera del tribunal en Minneapolis, Minnesota, antes de que comenzara el juicio por asesinato del oficial Derek Chauvin, el 29 de marzo de 2021. Stephen Maturen / Getty Images

Comenzó el juicio contra el policía que asesinó a George Floyd: 5 lecturas esenciales sobre la violencia policial contra los hombres negros

La muerte de Floyd, quien era negro, desencadenó una ola de protestas masivas contra el racismo en Estados Unidos. Este es un resumen de importantes investigaciones sobre la violencia policial.
Floyd’s nephew, Brandon Williams (center), with the Rev. Al Sharpton (left) outside the heavily guarded Hennepin County Government Center, in Minneapolis, Minn., before the murder trial of Officer Derek Chauvin began, March 29, 2021. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Derek Chauvin trial begins in George Floyd murder case: 5 essential reads on police violence against Black men

Research on racism and policing in the US, explained by the experts who study it.

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