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University of Colorado Boulder

At the foot of the Rocky Mountains, the University of Colorado Boulder is nationally recognized as one of only 36 AAU public research universities. Established in 1876, CU Boulder is a Tier 1 public research university with five Nobel laureates, nine MacArthur “genius” fellows and is the No. 1 public university recipient of NASA awards. CU Boulder is a leader in many fields, including aerospace engineering, physics and environmental law. The school partners with many notable federal research labs, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). CU Boulder students thrive academically and athletically, with Buff athletes competing in the NCAA Division I Pac-12 conference.

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Vaccination has allowed people to be more social again with much less risk of serious illness, but less cautious behaviors put people at an increased risk of catching the virus. Sabrina Bracher / iStock via Getty Images Plus

If I am vaccinated and get COVID-19, what are my chances of dying? The answer is surprisingly hard to find

Calculating your risk of death or hospitalization if you are infected with the coronavirus requires good data – notably, the total number of infections in the US. Unfortunately, that data is fuzzy.
Gender norms can affect every aspect of a person’s life, including their health. YES BRASIL/iStock via Getty Images Plus

In countries more biased against women, higher COVID-19 death rates for men might not tell an accurate story

Some countries report higher rates of COVID-19 cases and deaths among men. This might be due to underreporting among women with limited health access.
The compact olfactory system provides a more accessible way to study the brain as a whole. Esther Kok/EyeEm via Getty Images

From odor to action – how smells are processed in the brain and influence behavior

Understanding how the brain translates smells into behavior change can help advance search and rescue technology and treatments for neurological conditions.
The list of SARS-CoV-2 variants – each with its own unique qualities that give it an edge – just keeps growing. Matt Anderson Photography/Moment via Getty Images

Alpha then delta and now omicron – 6 questions answered as COVID-19 cases once again surge across the globe

People are buzzing with questions about the omicron variant and whether it could help usher in herd immunity. A team of virologists deciphers the latest findings.
Amid the latest surge of COVID-19 cases, health care workers yet again are having to make difficult triage decisions in caring for patients. Morsa Images/E+ via Getty Images

During a COVID-19 surge, ‘crisis standards of care’ involve excruciating choices and impossible ethical decisions for hospital staff

A physician-bioethicist reflects on how health professionals are yet again facing painful reminders of the early months of the pandemic.
Community members from Utqiagvik, Alaska, look to open water from the edge of shorefast sea ice. Matthew Druckenmiller

2021 Arctic Report Card reveals a (human) story of cascading disruptions, extreme events and global connections

Sea ice is thinning at an alarming rate. Snow is shifting to rain. And humans worldwide are increasingly feeling the impact of what happens in the seemingly distant Arctic.
Dancing with danger. West Side Story/Amblin

‘West Side Story’ may be timeless – but life in gangs today differs drastically from when the Jets and Sharks ruled the streets

Gangs have changed in the decades since ‘West Side Story’ first came out – they are deadlier, and their demographics are different – as are the means law enforcement use to control them.

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