Menu Close

University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is a national leader among public research universities, where more than 30,000 students are enrolled in over 100 undergraduate majors and 86 graduate fields of study, are situated in prime locations between New York and Boston. In recent years, the University has been busy racking up high-profile nods from organizations like U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its education and initiatives. The rise of the University over the last two decades has been astounding, as UConn achieves new heights of academic success – doubling research grants, attracting top students, and offering programs that continue to grow in prestige. Next Generation Connecticut, an unprecedented investment by the State of Connecticut, demonstrates UConn’s commitment to comprehensive research and education and ensures that we attract internationally renowned faculty and the world’s brightest students. With annual research expenditures in excess of $200 million, collaborative research is carried out within the departments of our 14 schools and colleges and at our more than 100 research centers and institutes. As a vibrant, progressive leader, UConn fosters a diverse and dynamic culture that meets the challenges of a changing global society.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 209 articles

El refugio de la Gruta Mandrin fue utilizado repetidamente por los neandertales y los humanos modernos durante milenios. Ludovic Slimak

Qué cambia con el descubrimiento de los primeros humanos modernos en Europa

Los artefactos de piedra y un diente fósil señalan que el Homo sapiens vivió en la Gruta Mandrin hace 54.000 años, en una época en la que los neandertales aún vivían en Europa.
This protest outside IOC headquarters in early 2022 objected to the Winter Games being held in China. Valentin Flauraud/AFP via Getty Images

What’s the IOC – and why doesn’t it do more about human rights issues related to the Olympics?

The International Olympic Committee oversees several humanitarian initiatives. But it avoids letting human rights concerns interfere with the Games, even in countries with rampant violations.
Mohammad Attaie and his wife, Deena, newly arrived from Afghanistan, get assistance from medical translator Jahannaz Afshar at the Valley Health Center TB/Refugee Program in San Jose, Calif., on Dec. 9, 2021. AP Photo/Eric Risberg

Tens of thousands of Afghan evacuees made it to the US – here’s how the resettlement process works

Nine agencies, most of them faith-based, are resettling Afghan evacuees in the US. But the system is under strain.
L'abri sous roche de la Grotte Mandrin a été utilisé à plusieurs reprises par les Néandertaliens et les humains modernes au cours des millénaires. Ludovic Slimak

Découverte des plus anciens hommes modernes en Europe (et ce que cela change de ce que l'on pensait de ses relations avec Néandertal)

Des artefacts en pierre et une dent fossile indiquent qu’Homo sapiens vivait à la Grotte Mandrin il y a 54 000 ans, à une époque où les Néandertaliens vivaient encore en Europe.
The Grotte Mandrin rock shelter saw repeated use by Neanderthals and modern humans over millennia. Ludovic Slimak

New research suggests modern humans lived in Europe 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, in Neanderthal territories

Stone artifacts and a fossil tooth point to Homo sapiens living at Grotte Mandrin 54,000 years ago, at a time when Neanderthals were still living in Europe.
Dans le nord-est du Costa Rica, une forêt âgée de 32 ans ayant poussé sur d’anciens pâturages. Robin Chazdon

Des données inédites sur la capacité des forêts tropicales à se régénérer rapidement

Une étude publiée en décembre 2021 met en lumière une alternative efficace et peu coûteuse au reboisement massif : laisser les forêts tropicales repousser naturellement.
Rioters are tear-gassed as they storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

American support for conspiracy theories and armed rebellion isn’t new – we just didn’t believe it before the Capitol insurrection

Almost eight years before the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol attack, nearly one-third of Americans surveyed – and 44% of Republicans – said armed rebellion might soon be necessary in the US to protect liberties.
If you aren’t a fan of holiday shopping, you aren’t alone. Dave Einsel/Getty Images

What’s the point of holiday gifts?

Gift-giving might seem needlessly cumbersome and stressful. But the costs and benefits of the custom aren’t what they seem.
The legacy of the Sandy Hook shootings in 2012 continues to reverberate nine years later, including in how conspiracy theories have changed since the tragedy. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP via Getty Images

How conspiracy theories in the US became more personal, more cruel and more mainstream after the Sandy Hook shootings

The Sandy Hook school shooting continues to reverberate in the US nine years later, marking a new age of misinformation.
A 32-year-old forest on former pastureland in northeastern Costa Rica. Robin Chazdon

Tropical forests can recover surprisingly quickly on deforested lands – and letting them regrow naturally is an effective and low-cost way to slow climate change

As governments and corporations pledge to help the planet by planting trillions of trees, a new study spotlights an effective, low-cost alternative: letting tropical forests regrow naturally.
There are dozens of options for children’s drinks in most supermarkets. Choosing the healthy options is difficult. ferrantraite/E+ via Getty Images

Companies are pushing sweetened drinks to children through advertising and misleading labels – and families are buying

A new study looked at advertising and purchase data for children’s drinks and suggests that ads and pricing strategies contribute to sweetened children’s drink purchases.
A young woman fetching water. Climate change literacy rates in Nigeria range from 71% in Kwara to 5% in Kano. Shutterstock

Africa’s first continent-wide survey of climate change literacy finds education is key

Education, historical trends in precipitation, and perceived drought experiences predict increased climate change literacy, but rates are lower for women, those in rural areas, and low-income groups.
Ancient military innovations – like the bit and bridle that enabled mounted horseback riding – changed the course of history. Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin/British Museum via WikimediaCommons

The horse bit and bridle kicked off ancient empires – a new giant dataset tracks the societal factors that drove military technology

Did ancient technological advancements drive social innovation, or vice versa? Studying cause and effect in the ancient world may seem like a fool’s errand, but researchers built a database to do just that.

Authors

More Authors