Menu Close

University of Maryland, Baltimore County

UMBC is a leading public research university known for innovative teaching, relevant research across disciplines, and a supportive community that empowers and inspires inquisitive minds. UMBC serves 14,000 undergraduate and graduate students, and combines the learning opportunities of a liberal arts college with the creative intensity of a leading research university. At the same time, UMBC is one of the country’s most inclusive education communities. UMBC also contributes to Maryland through strong government and industry partnerships that advance K–16 education, entrepreneurship, workforce training, and technology commercialization.

Find us on:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Snapchat: @UMBClife

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 223 articles

Taiwanese independence activists call for a boycott of the Beijing Games. Walid Berrazeg/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Why is Taiwan competing in the Olympics under ‘Chinese Taipei’?

Taiwanese authorities are allowing its tiny contingent to attend the opening ceremony in Beijing despite a long-running dispute over its name in the Olympics.
Parents say there has been a lack of academic and social learning opportunities for children during the pandemic. SDI Productions/E+ via Getty Images

5 tips to help preschoolers with special needs during the pandemic

The pandemic and shifts to virtual learning have set many children back academically. The setbacks can be particularly challenging for children with disabilities, but recovery is possible.
Table-tipping workshop with mediums Jane and Chris Howarth in Erie, Pennsylvania, in 2014. © Shannon Taggart. Courtesy of the Artist.

As spiritualism’s popularity grows, photographer Shannon Taggart takes viewers inside the world of séances, mediums and orbs

Alternative beliefs like spiritualism seem to experience resurgences in times of crisis. Taggart has spent the past 20 years exploring the oft-misunderstood religion.
Like much else, scientific labs have been shut down by the pandemic. Cavan Images/Cavan via Getty Images

Sold-out supplies, serving a public need and other adventures of doing science during a pandemic – 4 researchers share their experiences

Supply chain issues, emergency science, social distancing requirements and a lot more free time offered both challenges and opportunities for research scientists.
Some colleges and universities may be using AI technology to help teach their students. skynesher/E+ via Getty Images

Future of college will involve fewer professors

A futurist who focuses on education technology says artificial intelligence is slowly making human professors less vital to colleges and universities.
Flooding is seen in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia after the remnants of Hurricane Ida, Sept. 2, 2021. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Cities worldwide aren’t adapting to climate change quickly enough

More than half of the world’s population lives in cities, and that share is growing. Rapid climate change could make many cities unlivable in the coming decades without major investments to adapt.
Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria and play a potential role in the evolution of life. NANOCLUSTERING/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Viruses are both the villains and heroes of life as we know it

Viruses have gotten a bad rap for the many illnesses and pandemics they’ve caused. But viruses are also genetic innovators – and possibly the pioneers of using DNA as the genetic blueprint of life.
A new rule is intended to let patients comparison shop for hospital services. Black Lollipop/iStock via Getty Images

How to make comparing prices of an MRI or colonoscopy as easy as shopping for a new laptop

Health researchers hope a new regulation requiring hospitals to post their prices will tame soaring health care costs, but compliance and standardization are hurdles.
It’s back: Rush-hour traffic in Los Angeles on June 15, 2021. Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

As urban life resumes, can US cities avert gridlock?

The pandemic offered a tantalizing look at city life with fewer cars in the picture. But with traffic rebounding, there’s limited time to lock in policies that make streets more people-friendly.
It doesn’t take a human mind to produce misinformation convincing enough to fool experts in such critical fields as cybersecurity. iLexx/iStock via Getty Images

Study shows AI-generated fake reports fool experts

Bots flooding social media with fake news about politics is bad enough. Muddying the waters in such fields as cybersecurity and health care could put lives at risk.
Eight out of 10 Asian American youths reported being bullied and harassed during the pandemic. RyanJLane/E+ via Getty Images

Are America’s schools safe for Asian Americans?

Asian Americans are more likely to participate in remote learning than other racial groups, federal data show. To understand why, three experts weigh in.

Authors

More Authors